why you're still breaking out in your 20's

Like most teenagers, pimples usually started to creep up when you hit puberty, this is the time when hormones are naturally fluctuating and you probably learnt that after this awkward stage in your life is over, so are your breakouts. But surprise! Acne is now more relevant than ever and many of us find we are still breaking out in our 20’s and even 30’s.

Hormones

Unlike in your teenage years, fluctuating hormones when you’re an adult are largely triggered by inflammation and stress, specifically around that time of the month. An increase in the production of progesterone (which happens after ovulation) rapidly increases your skins sebum production, leading to breakouts. Adult acne occurs mostly in women age 26 and above and according to the International Dermal Institute 40-55 percent of adults are diagnosed with low grade acne, persistent acne and oily skin.

Stress

We know that chronic stress can play a huge role in skin issues like acne and it’s strongly suspected that the hormone cortisol may be responsible for the link. When you’re stressed, your adrenal gland releases cortisol, which is commonly referred to as the “stress hormone,” cortisol is actually an important compound that helps regulate a ton of different bodily processes, including the immune system, digestive system, and neurological systems affecting your mood. Its levels naturally fluctuate over time. But when you experience stress—especially chronic stress, cortisol can start working overtime, causing issues with those bodily processes, including messing with your skin

We know that chronic stress can play a huge role in skin issues like acne and it’s strongly suspected that the hormone cortisol may be responsible for the link. When you’re stressed, your adrenal gland releases cortisol, which is commonly referred to as the “stress hormone,” cortisol is actually an important compound that helps regulate a ton of different bodily processes, including the immune system, digestive system, and neurological systems affecting your mood. Its levels naturally fluctuate over time. But when you experience stress—especially chronic stress, cortisol can start working overtime, causing issues with those bodily processes, including messing with your skin

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